Like Asian lady beetles, Boxelder bugs are a common sight for many homeowners in the spring and the fall. These bugs are about half an inch long and are black with red lines on their wings. Boxelders predominantly feed on seeds, specifically those of the boxelder tree for which they are named, but also the silver maple and some ash trees. They are frequently found in large numbers around the female, seed-bearing trees. They are also known to feed on the flowers and leaves of these trees, though it is less common.

Adult boxelder bugs lay their eggs in the spring, and these eggs hatch into the young of the species, called nymphs. These nymphs are much smaller than the adults and are more red than black. They nymphs will develop into adults over the summer, and mate and lay another batch of eggs that hatch in the fall.

Controlling Boxelder Bugs

Boxelder bugs can often be found on the southwest side of your home in the fall. The population of these bugs can number into the thousands, which can be problematic for homeowners. During this time, they are looking for a place to settle down for the winter, and will often get into your home through small cracks in walls, door and window casings, attics and around foundations. On warm days, they can become active and fly around inside your home. They are harmless bugs, and do not cause damage to homes. However, they can be difficult to get rid of when they appear in large numbers. Give Advanced Wildlife Control a call and our technicians can help you get rid of your boxelder bug problem!

Did You Know?
Boxelder bugs have a reputation as tree killers, but that is not actually true! They cause very little damage to the trees they are reliant on.